Your nameFriend's name
Your emailFriend's email

A clinical audit to assess the efficacy of the Coolsense® Pain Numbing Applicator for intravenous cannulation in children

Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia

Summary

The Coolsense® device is a topical applicator that is used to anaesthetise the skin before a painful procedure. It is a handheld device with a temperature-controlled head that acts on application, without chemicals, to cool and anaesthetise the site of injection. This prospective observational audit of 100 children and adolescents aged six to 18 years studied the analgesic efficacy and patient and carer satisfaction rating of the device during intravenous cannulation and complications arising from its use. The audit demonstrated effective skin analgesia for intravenous cannulation in children and adolescents. Ninety-four percent of patients rated the pain during cannulation as less than or equal to three on a numerical pain rating scale of zero to ten. Patient and carer satisfaction with the device and cannulation success rates were high; 66% of patients and 82% of carers ‘really liked’ the device and 28% of patients and 12% of carers ‘liked’ it. Ninety-five percent of patients were cannulated on the first attempt. The incidence of complications using the device was low. The Coolsense device appears to be a useful tool that provides effective analgesia for intravenous cannulation in children with minimal complications. Comparative studies with topical local anaesthesia creams are warranted.

ASA member / Anaesthesia and Intensive Care subscriber

If you are a member of the ASA or subscribe to the Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Journal please login to view entire article.

Purchase 24-hour access

If you are not a member, you may purchase 24-hour access to the entire article by simply selecting your country and clicking the 'Purchase' button below.

Select your country:

Purchase a subscription

For unlimited access to all articles, you can subscribe to the Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Journal.